Hus Kingpin: Portishus

Big fan of the latest release from Hus Kingpin. Having already flirted with Portishead samples in the past, the New York rapper now returns with a full project inspired by the legendary Bristol band. And it is. Not just sample wise, although there are a few noticeable ones that creep in along the way, but more in the mournful, slightly melancholic sound that the production takes. Impressive features too, including a blinding appearance from Breeze Brewin on Chasing Ghosts. I’m also a big fan of the way they work an interview with Beth Gibbons into the intro of the track which takes her name as the title; good shit. You can hear a preview of the LP below, with physicals available via wavo3000.com.

An Ode to Dummy

On this day in 1994, an album was released that encapsulated what was known back then as “the Bristol Sound”. Trip hop was in its infancy and I don’t know if the term had even been coined at that stage – even though the main players all hated it when it was – but it existed and it drew on elements from multiple genres, including hip hop, funk, dub and sprinkle of psychedelia.
When Dummy was released I honestly didn’t know what to think of it. I was 14 and already well into hip hop, so there was plenty of stuff within the record that intrigued me, like the scratching on Mysterons or the beats on Strangers and Glory Box. But for the most part I was unsure. I think it probably took another year or so for me to fully appreciate its importance; then as with most things like that, I got obsessed with it. This was pre-internet so all my knowledge came from the liner notes and Geoff Barrow’s interviews.

Continue reading “An Ode to Dummy”

Portishead: SOS

Something a bit different today, but something that needs to be shared. My fellow Bristolians, Portishead, yesterday released a video in tribute to Jo Cox. If you’re outside the UK, Jo was an MP who was shot and killed last week, triggered an outpouring of grief from the public, in part because of her liberal stance on matters such as the refugee crisis and immigration. Continue reading “Portishead: SOS”